From Communal Baths to Private Sanctuaries: The Evolution of Bathrooms in the 19th Century

Bathrooms Only Exist In the 19th Century.

Regia Marinho

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Bathrooms, as we know them today, with their modern amenities and fixtures for personal hygiene, were not a common feature of households until the 19th century.

Before this time, bathing practices varied significantly across different cultures and historical periods, often in communal settings or through more rudimentary methods.

In ancient civilizations such as those of Greece and Rome, communal baths were central to social and cultural life.

These public bathing facilities, known as thermae or balneae, served as gathering places for socializing, relaxation, and hygiene.

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However, private bathing spaces within individual residences were rare, and bathing was often performed using basins, pitchers, or tubs in various house rooms.

Throughout the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries, the use of public baths declined gradually in the West.

Private spaces were favored, thus laying the foundations for the bathroom, as it was to become, in the 20th century.

During the Middle Ages, bathing fell out of favor in Europe due to religious and cultural beliefs that associated bathing with immorality or disease.

As a result, personal hygiene practices became more limited, and bathing was often viewed as unnecessary or harmful.

Instead, people relied on methods such as dry rubbing with cloths or perfumes to cleanse the body.

It wasn’t until the 19th century that attitudes toward bathing began to change, spurred by advancements in sanitation, hygiene, and plumbing technology.

The emergence of the Industrial Revolution brought about improvements in infrastructure and urban planning, including the development of water supply and sewage systems.

These advancements made indoor plumbing more feasible and affordable, paving the way for the introduction of…

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Regia Marinho

I write about ideas, technology, the future and inspire the world through art. Artist. Civil engineer. https://regiaart.com